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Book Reviews

Fiction

Book Review:

The Invisible Like of Addie Larue by V.E. Schwab

In this beautifully written novel, Addie Larue seeks new experiences and a wider world that her early 18th-century French village can afford her. On the run from an arranged marriage, Addie strikes a bargain with a certain Dark Stranger: live forever in complete freedom. Freedom to do as she wishes, but also “freedom” from being remembered by anyone she sees, including her family.  While the Stranger believes she will soon tire of the struggle, Addie is determined to live, learn, and find what love she can, living through three centuries until a new experience in21st century New York City changes everything.

Addie, resilient and determined, drives this compelling story of love, freedom, and the human need for connection, and readers will want to journey with her to the book’s end and beyond.

J.R.

Fiction

Book Review:

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Admittedly, this novel has received ample enough praise already. That being said, Moreno-Garcia deserves every good review thrown her way for Mexican Gothic. If you are looking for a reason to be wary of shrooms and a little more skeptical of colonizing English families, you are looking at the perfect novel to start preparing for the spooky season.

 

C.B.

Fiction

Book Review:

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

This absolute doorstopper of a fantasy book does not waste any time throwing the reader into a world full of political intrigue, criminal scandal, and dragons.

 

C.B.

Mystery

Book Review:

The Vanished Bride by Bella Ellis (Berkley 2019)

The Vanished Bride is a very enjoyable historical mystery set in Yorkshire and features the Bronte family; yes, the whole clan is involved in one way or another with a strange disappearance. Ms. Ellis’ knowledge of the famous family shines through as the sisters and brother figure out how to be “detectors” in a place and era when everyone was effectively isolated. Combine this tension with the stress of novice authors, hostility to women, overfondness for drink, and a semi-benign intruding father, all in a well-researched and written narrative, and you will be reading a fine debut novel.

M.W.

Historical Fiction

Book Review:

The Paris Dressmaker by Kristy Cambron (Thomas Nelson)

Perfect for historical fiction devotees, this novel is based on true events, and real lives lived during World War II Paris.  The story focuses on two memorable, courageous women who resist Nazi occupation and the darkness of those war years in Paris.  One is a dress designer, and another is an art cataloguer, both of which narrowly survive Nazi entrapment.  While maintaining their faith that “lighter” times will prevail, both protagonists are Resistance supporters who champion France, Paris, and the French way of life.  A great combination of romance, intrigue, and history!

– L.Q.

Fiction

Book Review:

Pefect timing by Owen Nicholls

This is not the fun and whimsical tale of love you’re expecting. There is a likely possibility that the reader will not like these characters at all times, but they are the embodiment of the idea that everybody deserves love and to be loved for they really are.

 

C.B.