Eternal - Lisa Scottoline (G.P. Putnam's Sons)

Unfolding over decades, Eternal is a tale of loyalty and loss, family and food, love and war–all set in one of the world’s most beautiful cities at its darkest moment. This moving novel will be forever etched in the hearts and minds of readers.


The Splendid and the Vile - Erik Larson (Crown Publishing Group)

Erik Larson shows, in cinematic detail, how Churchill taught the British people “the art of being fearless.” It is a story of political brinkmanship, but it’s also an intimate domestic drama.  Drawing on diaries, original archival documents, and once-secret intelligence reports–some released only recently–Larson provides a new lens on London’s darkest year through the day-to-day experience of Churchill and his family and the advisers in Churchill’s “Secret Circle” to whom he turns in the most challenging moments.


The Walker - Matthew Beaumont (Verso)

There is no such thing as a false step. Every time we walk we are going somewhere. Especially if we are going nowhere. Moving around the modern city is not a way of getting from A to B, but of understanding who and where we are. In a series of riveting intellectual rambles, Matthew Beaumont retraces episodes in the history of the walker since the mid-nineteenth century


The Art of Solitude - Stephen Batchelor (Yale University Press)

When world-renowned Buddhist writer Stephen Batchelor turned sixty, he took a sabbatical from his teaching and turned his attention to solitude, a practice integral to the meditative traditions he has long studied and taught. He aimed to venture more deeply into solitude, discovering its full extent and depth.

In a hyperconnected world that is at the same time plagued by social isolation, this book shows how to enjoy the inescapable solitude that is at the heart of human life.


The Vanished Collection - Pauline Baer de Perignon (New Vessel Press)

It all started with a list of paintings. There, scribbled by a cousin she hadn't seen for years, were the names of the masters whose works once belonged to her great-grandfather, Jules Strauss: Renoir, Monet, Degas, Tiepolo, and more. Pauline Baer de Perignon knew little to nothing about Strauss, or about his vanished, precious art collection. But the list drove her on a frenzied trail of research in the archives of the Louvre and the Dresden museums, through Gestapo records, and to consult with Nobel laureate Patrick Modiano. What happened in 1942? And what became of the collection after Nazis seized her great-grandparents' elegant Parisian apartment? The quest takes Pauline Baer de Perignon from the Occupation of France to the present day as she breaks the silence around the wrenching experiences her family never fully transmitted, and asks what art itself is capable of conveying over time.


The Widow Clicquot - Tilar Mazzeo (Harper)

The Widow Clicquot is a biography of the visionary young widow who built a champagne empire, became a legend in her tumultuous times, and showed the world how to live with style. Mazzeo brings to life the woman behind the label, Barbe-Nicole Clicquot Ponsardin, in this utterly intoxicating book that is as much a fascinating journey through the process of making this temperamental wine as a biography of a uniquely tempered and fascinating woman.


Land: How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World - Simon Winchester (Harper)

Land is central to our existence, whether meadow or mountainside, desert or peat bog, parkland or pasture, suburb or city. It quite literally underlies and underpins everything. Employing the keen intellect, insatiable curiosity, and narrative verve that are the foundations of his previous bestselling works, Simon Winchester examines what we human beings are doing–and have done–with the billions of acres that together make up the solid surface of our planet.

Land: How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World examines in depth how we acquire land, how we steward it, how and why we fight over it, and finally, how we can, and on occasion do come to share it. Ultimately, Winchester confronts the essential question: who actually owns the world’s land–and why does it matter?


Lessons in Chemistry - Bonnie Garmus (Doubleday)

Here comes another strong protagonist who challenges the status quo! Filled with humor and quirky characters, this title is easily comparable in tone to Where’d You Go Bernadette or Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk.

In the early ‘60’s, Elizabeth Zott is a scientist with a mind of her own. She takes a new job as the host of a local daytime cooking TV show when she is fired from her research position for being both pregnant and unwed. As cooking is chemistry and chemistry is change, she brings revolutionary ideas to American housewives via her cooking show.

She is a one-of-a-kind heroine with a great canine companion both of which you will wish you could get to know in real life!